CUSTOMER SERVICE / FAQ

QUICK LINKS


ABOUT NCWD


Q. WHAT IS THE NEWHALL COUNTY WATER DISTRICT?


A. Newhall County Water District (NCWD) is one of four water purveyors in the Santa Clarita Valley and supplies a population of approximately 30,000 with over 9,500 service connections. The water District is governed by a five-member board of directors, elected at large by residents of the District. Its 34-square mile service area includes four areas in the valley — Pinetree, Newhall, Tesoro Del Valle and Castaic.


Q. WHAT DOES NCWD DO?


A. NCWD is responsible for the production and distribution of or blend of State Water Project water and local groundwater wells. Once distributed to customers, the water is then used for commerical, residential and irrigation purposes.


Q. HOW CAN I FIND OUT ABOUT JOB OPENINGS WITH NCWD?


A. Employment opportunities are listed on NCWD’s Web site at https://www.ncwd.org/employment.htm.

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WATER QUALITY


Q. WHY IS THE WATER FROM MY FAUCET SOMETIMES CLOUDY?


A. Cloudy tap water is caused by air bubbles in the water. It is completely harmless and does not affect the water’s taste or quality. If the water is allowed to sit for a couple minutes, the air will dissipate and the water will clear.


Q. IS OUR DRINKING WATER CONSIDERED HARD OR SOFT?

A. The hardness of the valley’s drinking water ranges by geographic region. Some areas are as soft as 108 mg/L and some as hard as 375 mg/L. To learn the hardness level of a particular area, read the district’s annual Water Quality Report online – Consumer Confidence Report (CCR).


Q. WHERE DOES THE NCWD’S DRINKING WATER COME FROM?


A. The sources of drinking water include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. For our system, surface water comes primarily from the State Water Project (SWP) operated by the State Department of Water Resources, which is 660 miles system of rivers, aqueducts and reservoirs that transport water from the Sierra Nevada to Southern California SWP contractors for use as agricultural or urban supply. CLWA’s SWP water is transported to Castaic Lake, and is later blended with groudwater. Our valley’s groundwater comes from local wells, some which tap into the shallow Alluvial Aquifer beneath the Santa Clara River and its tributaries and others which draw from the deeper Saugus Formation.


Q. HOW CAN I LEARN MORE ABOUT THE QUALITY OF MY DRINKING WATER


A. Each year, NCWD publishes a Water Quality Report in accordance with state law. This free report lists the substances detected in the drinking water and provides the state and federal drinking water regulations for those substances. A copy of this report is available at Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) or by calling the District’s Water Quality Department at (661) 259-3610.

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WATER EFFICIENCY


Q. HOW CAN I LEARN MORE ABOUT WATER EFFICIENCY?


A. First, be aware that most households in the desert use 70 to 80 percent of the water outside on landscaping, washing cars, hosing driveways and filling pools. Therefore, smarter water management outside the home will have the most significant overall impact on your water use and water bill.

Here are some conservation tips for outside the home:

  • Adjust your irrigation time with the seasons. An average spray irrigation system needs only to run 3-4 minutes per day in the winter to keep grass healthy.
  • Replace at least a portion of your grass with water-efficient landscaping, rocks and decomposed granite. Converting an all-grass lawn to all desert landscaping can result in a 70 percent reduction in water use.
  • Sprinklers should be positioned to water the yard, not sidewalks and streets. Try changing the angle of a sprinkler head or using a type that sprays fl at to avoid water loss due to wind. Move sprinkler heads 12-18 inches from hardscape, designing the edges of the yard with water-efficient plants on a drip irrigation system.
  • Use a broom instead of the hose to clean driveways and sidewalks. Don’t let the hose run when washing a car, but instead use a nozzle that can be turned off when water isn’t needed.

Here are some conservation tips for inside the home:

  • Replace worn-out fixtures, washers and o-rings to avoid leaking faucets. Small leaks in faucets and toilets can waste 200 gallons per day. Moderate leaks can waste 800 gallons per day.
  • To determine if you have a leak in your system, shut off all water-using fixtures and the irrigation system and look at your meter (be careful of spiders or bees under the lid). If the dial is showing water use, despite everything being turned off , there is a leak. For small leaks you may have to note the dial position and return several minutes later to see if there has been movement.

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WATER METERS AND WATER BILL


Q. HOW DO I APPLY FOR WATER SERVICE?


A. To apply for Water Service contact Customer Service at (661) 259-3610.


Q. HOW DO I KNOW MY WATER METER IS WORKING CORRECTLY?


A. Each meter used by NCWD must meet the high standards of the American Water Works Association and must be accurate within 1.5 percent in order to pass inspection. When meters do fail, usually due to excessive wear or corrosion, the result is water moving through the meter undetected, causing an inaccurately low reading.


Q. HOW IS MY WATER USE DETERMINED?


A. Your water meter mechanically records water as it flows through the pipes. For most meters, an employee visually reads the meter each month and inputs the reading into a hand-held computer. If the reading is unusually high or low the computer will beep. Employees are then required to take another look and input it a second time to ensure he or she is reading and inputting the number accurately. Newer, automated meters send the information directly to the billing department.


Q. WHAT CAN CAUSE AN UNUSUALLY HIGH WATER BILL?


A. There are a number of factors that could result in an unusually high water bill. For example, out-of-town guests may increase water usage through showers. During the summer, refilling the pool or increasing your landscape watering time (which should be decreased again when fall arrives) can cause a significant boost in water use.


Q. WHAT IF I SUSPECT MY UNUSUALLY HIGH WATER BILL ISN’T CAUSED BY WATER USE?


A. First, determine if you have a leak in your system. Shut off all water-using fixtures and the irrigation system and look at your water meter (be careful of spiders or bees under the lid). If the dial is showing water use, despite everything being turned off, then there is a leak. Toilet leaks are perhaps the most common. Call a leak detection company to find the leak. You can always call NCWD for an analysis of your bill based on a two-year history of usage and request that an employee conduct a field test of your system.


Q. WHAT DO I DO IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY?


A. To help prepare it’s customers for an emergency, NCWD has created a new pamphlet that covers utilty shut off and safety instructions. The pamphlet also covers water disinfection procedures. A copy of this report is available by calling the District’s Customer Service Department at (661) 259-3610.

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